James Dines Predicts a Buying Panic in Uranium

1205
Over the years, Dines successfully forecast the Internet mania, forecasting the giants of the tech boom, and forecasting the tech bust. A gold bug again, Dines also added uranium as the metal to watch over the coming years, saying, “This is my way of playing the whole coming energy boom.” We talked with Jim Dines about the “melt up” in the uranium sector.
investing, stocks, uranium, mining, oil, gold, utilities, nuclear energy, commodities, bull market, labor shortage, drill rigs, exploration, geologist
Over the years, Dines successfully forecast the Internet mania, forecasting the giants of the tech boom, and forecasting the tech bust. A gold bug again, Dines also added uranium as the metal to watch over the coming years, saying, “This is my way of playing the whole coming energy boom.”

Interviewer: You have been calling a bull market in uranium and, once again, you were the first voice in the now-growing crowd of uranium bulls.

James Dines: What a surprise.

Interviewer: Why are you bullish on uranium?

James Dines: It very important to get into a bull market early. The earlier, the better. That when the biggest percentage gains are made. That why we got into the Internets very early. We got stopped out in 2000. We were in cash for a year and then went to metals, as the way to play the China boom in 2001. Wee still in those. In 2002, we turned bullish on uranium as a unique way to play the coming boom in the whole energy complex.

Interviewer: But why uranium, as opposed to another type of metal?

James Dines: Basically, the western world demand is outpacing supply by about 300 million pounds a year. Global uranium use, excluding the growing usage by China and the former Soviet Union, is running at around 155 million pounds a year, as compared with global production of only around 94 million pounds. There are only about 500 customers for this stuff, not counting terrorists (joke). Because of that, it not a regular commodity. The public can’t go and buy uranium. In August 2003, there was a shocking blackout in Canada. The utilities were shaken. They realized when they don’t pay attention, the lights go out. That was a kick in the shin for utilities to begin immediate investment in the infrastructure of the electricity grid. But what is completely under the world radar is that nuclear plants are also concerned about a shortage of uranium. If they run out of uranium, the lights go out. You can’t switch to another fuel. You can’t toss another log on the fire, so to speak. Because of that, there is a growing panic among the buyers. That why I became what I’m calling myself: The Original Uranium Bug. And calling, or predicting, the coming Uranium Melt Up and buying panic.

Interviewer: A panic over uranium. Why do you say that?

James Dines: There going to be a buying panic. The bottom line is that in 2002, there were 441 nuclear reactors worldwide and another 34 under construction. Six new reactors began commercial production in 2002, three in China, two in South Korea and one in Japan. There was construction begun on six reactors in India and four in South Korea. There are more units coming in Finland, Russia, Ukraine, Romania, and Brazil. China announced recently they were going to build five more nuclear facilities. All of the governments of the world have been frightened by the talk of the difficulty in getting oil. I wouldn’t be surprised if more of them began building up their strategic oil reserves as the US has done. That would turbo the whole carbon-based fuel crisis higher. That makes nuclear more than a competitor. The price of uranium hit $7.10 on Christmas Day 2000, and then began a low, quiet and slow climb. The bottom line, which I outlined in my book on Mass Psychology, is that a new bull market must be invisible to the crowd. The corollary to that is when you see bandwagon on Wall Street, you are too late.

Interviewer: Some are making predictions of $50 uranium or even higher. What do you think?

James Dines: $50, $60, anything is possible. If you are running a utility and your choice was getting uranium at any price or having the lights go out, which would you do? This is my way of playing the whole coming energy boom. I think it the smartest way. This is unique. This metal is just not there. Wee just not going to have it.

Interviewer: How much of a role does Cameco (NYSE: CCJ) play in this market?

James Dines: They control the world largest high-grade reserves and low-cost operations, commanding position. They supply around 20 percent of the western world uranium. It America only uranium producer, in Wyoming and Nebraska. Around 20 percent of America energy is produced by nuclear. That accounts for around 35 percent of the western world consumption.

Interviewer: Is there any other way to play the uranium bull market?

James Dines: There is no other way to play it, as far I know of. The utilities buy the stuff so you can’t buy the metal. There is no other way. That why I like the uranium way of playing the energy boom. Some of my other predictions, like the Coming Age of the End of Petroleum ?this century is going to see the end of the petroleum age. Wee going to use it up. You have China and India coming onstream. You’ve got the automobile age coming to those two countries. Not even one percent of their citizens own cars yet. With all these cars coming onstream, suddenly everyone is frightened about nailing down their petroleum supplies. I don’t have to tell you how explosive the Middle East could be. Anything could happen there. A revolution in Saudi Arabia ?the most valuable real estate on the planet and it being gunned after by not just Al Qaedah, but every other big player on the land mass is saying, we need oil. That where the pool is. As that pool shrinks, it going to become more and more valuable. There will be more of a stampede into other energy sources. You already see it going into coal and natural gas. Unless theye going to start putting windmills on cars, it over. When it will end, who knows?

Interviewer: Any guesses?

James Dines: You hear all kinds of guesses. There were only so many dinosaurs and ferns. It finite, and it is dirt cheap. People snivel at $1.67 for gasoline, but they pay $10/gallon for Gatorade. White-out is $25/gallon. Evian is $21/gallon. Pepto-Bismol is $123/gallon. People have no concept of how high oil is going to go. Oil is going to go through the roof. A sound energy portfolio should certainly include some oils. But to me, the center of the chessboard is going to be uranium. It going to get a lot worse before it gets better. Once you start getting sky-high prices for oil, there no limit to what uranium could do. Even with an accelerated drilling program, it going to take years to bring it on. And they haven’t even started it yet. There an energy crisis coming of the first magnitude.
********************************************
James Dines, editor of The Dines Letter since 1960, has been making recommendations to investors for over 40 years. Recommendations of The Dines Letter are based on mass psychology, technical and fundamental economics thus studying both the company and investor behavior. Mr. Dines’ insights have gained him a reputation as a well-renowned, highly respected and regarded investment advisor.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Bear Market, Bull Market or Dead-cat Bounce…It Matters Little to the Stalwart Penny Stock

530
Over the last eight weeks [June, 2006] I’ve been spending a lot of time reading articles describing the current market conditions…trying to figure if it really affects penny stock investors. Are we in a bull market…are we wading into a bear market. Or is the recent rally just a dead-cat bounce?
penny stock,penny stocks,stocks,bull market,market,investors,investing,stock market
Over the last eight weeks [June, 2006] I’ve been spending a lot of time reading articles describing the current market conditions…trying to figure if it really affects penny stock investors.

Are we in a bull market…are we wading into a bear market. Or is the recent rally just a dead-cat bounce?

The dead cat bounce refers to a short-term recovery in a declining trend. There’s a (relatively) old saying in investing: even a dead cat will bounce if it’s dropped from high enough.

No matter how you slice it…I’m not sure it even matters to penny stock investors like you and me.

For example…stocks surged in Japan this week as reports showed growth in manufacturing and exports. Markets rose across Asia as investors were encouraged by Wednesday’s gains on Wall Street.

Strong earnings reports from two bellwether stocks gave penny stock investors hope that rising interest rates wouldn’t kill profits. The recent sell-off, said one economist was “just turbulence.”

The turbulence, it seems, is continuing on this side of the pond. U.S. stocks traded flat to lower Thursday as the market took a breather as higher oil prices and downbeat economic data curbed Wall Street’s momentum. So, what are we to believe, is the market heading up…or heading down?

How does the market look in general terms? As far as stocks are concerned, the S&P index is up just 0.3 percent for the year, the Dow is up 3.4 percent and the NASDAQ is down 2.9 percent. Not sparkling data.

But for penny stock investors, the recent roller coaster ride that many seasoned blue chip investors are reeling over, is just par for the course. We know that a penny stock is often volatile and just as unpredictable.

While a penny stock may be more vibrant when the market is upbeat, in general, a penny stock marches to its own tune. Why? Few investors venture into the field of penny stocks because they are either unwilling or unable to do the work required to accurately predict what these shares may do.

By their nature, it is nearly impossible to know what price a penny stock share should be trading at, and conventional financial ratios and industry comparisons are rarely effective measures for realizing a penny stock’s value. Large one-day percentage gains and losses are not an uncommon occurrence for penny stock investors.

So really, bull, bear or cat…it’s just another day at the computer screen for penny stock investors. The work may be fun…but it’s not easy. Of the 14,000 public companies in the U.S., about 3,300 are considered penny stocks that trade on the OTC Bulletin Board operated by the NASDAQ.

Their visibility is low, chances are you’ve never heard of their CEO and I doubt they have any institutional following. And while they’re highly speculative, the more promising ones have a targeted business plans, and solid positions in niche markets. And for now, they’re flying under the radar of Wall Street

So what do you do in an unpredictable market like the one we’re in? Continue applying the same principles you’ve always used when searching for that untapped penny stock. And enjoy the volatility.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Familiarizing Commonly Used Stock Market Terminologies

The stock market is a great arena for people to make a lot of money, however, for many beginners, all the hustle and bustle of stock trading may cause a lot of confusion, especially if you are not familiar with the many terms and tactics used for negotiations.

If you are a beginner in the stocks game, make sure that you familiarize and educate yourself well on stock trading knowledge. You can of course, start off by widening your vocabulary. Here are a few terms that you may need to familiarize:

Stocks

Stocks are probably the most important and common items traded in the stock market. These are actually shares of certain companies, which are publicly sold and traded.

Whenever people buy a portion of stock in a particular company, this means that they acquire a share of ownership and investing in that specific business. Through this, a stockholder is given certain rights towards the company such as a vote in stockholder meetings as well as his or her financial share from the company’s earnings.

Broker

A stockbroker is the person who handles the actual trading of stocks. He or she does the negotiations to buy and sell the stocks in behalf of the investors and the companies involved. The many various types of brokers may include full-service, online, auto-trade and discount brokers.

Bull Market

A bull market is a market that manifests a continuous increase in the value of its stocks as well as a steady growth. Generally, with this type of market, investors gain an optimistic attitude and may want to buy more rather than sell stocks.

Bear Market

Bear markets mainly characterize significant losses and declines in a particular market. With this type of behavior among stocks, most investors would generally want to sell more of their stocks and may be pessimistic about investing.

Dividends

Dividends are added or bonus payments given to stockholders after a profitable quarter. With this sum of money, many people may often reinvest on more shares of stock, which allows individuals to earn so much.

Futures

Futures, just like stocks, are also traded in the market. However, these are purchased against future costs of commodities. You can earn from these, if in time, the actual price of commodities become higher than what you paid for the futures. On the other hand, you can also lose money if the price becomes lower that what you paid for.

Day Trader

A day trader is the person who buys and sells stocks aggressively in one day. Usually, he or she does this for several times each day in order to make quite a few small profits within the day.

Trading on Margin

Trading on margin may be similar to trading stocks with the use of borrowed money. Through this, you can purchase shares of stock for only a portion of the actual price. The remainder of the cost can be paid upon the actual sale of the particular stock, or on a later date.

These terms are only a few of the most commonly used language in stock trading. And upon encountering them, you may certainly have the impression of how intimidating the stock market can get. With the many complicated terminologies and tactics, you may easily get backtracked if you do not know enough about what you are dealing with.

Remember that if you are new at doing business in this arena, make sure that you take the extra mile to learn more about more terms as well as strategies on how you can best maximize profit. A little hard work will certainly get you far, and one of these days you will realize how all of this can pay off.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,